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Level 3 Diploma EYE NVQ Level 3 support for: NVQ Children's Care, Learning and Development, Diploma for the Children and Young People's Workforce, England's Early years Educator qualification Please DO NOT COPY and PASTE information from this forum and then submit the work as your own. Plagiarism risks you failing the course and the development of your professional knowledge.

Snail playdough activities that explore letter formation

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Old 05-21-2011, 06:32 PM
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lyn c lyn c is offline
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Default unit 3.4 (3.2)

Hi everyone
My mind is completely frazzled and for the life of me cannot think!
So does anyone think that they can give me guidance on how to complete this question
Explain the dilemma between the rights and choices of children and young people and health and safety requirements.
I have started but just know the dillemas but can't think of how to word them, this is what i have done so far but just can't think anymore:


The UN convention on the rights of any child clearly identifies the rights of the children and young people to learn and develop into adults and be protected from harm, so it up to each setting to protect all children in their care from harm. There are 54 articles about the rights of children and they are there to protect children under the age of 18.
Each child is an individual who makes choices and likes to experience different areas but they donít have the experience or the skills to make safe choices. The carers therefore identify any potential hazard and judge if it is safe for the child to continue but the child needs to have a balanced approach of risk to continue to develop and make choices of their own.
The adults role is to encourage the child to explore, learn to make choices and have their voice heard when decisions are being made that involve or affect them.
Health and safety regulations may sometimes put a limit on those freedoms, so for the child's wellbeing and safety we may limit their options.
Here are a few examples of dilemmas between the rights and the choices of children and young people:


Please help me only asking for guidance!
Lynne
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Old 05-26-2011, 08:15 AM
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lyn c lyn c is offline
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Hi,
Wasn't sure about this question so just handed in what i had done and won't get feedback until 13th june, don't think what i done was enough so will probably have to redo it but at least my tutor will give me a little guidance in what i am missing, nut this is what i wrote:
The UN convention on the rights of any child clearly identifies the rights of the children and young people to learn and develop into adults and be protected from harm, so it up to each setting to protect all children in their care from harm. There are 54 articles about the rights of children and they are there to protect children under the age of 18.
Each child is an individual who makes choices and likes to experience different areas but they don’t have the experience or the skills to make safe choices. The carers therefore identify any potential hazard and judge if it is safe for the child to continue but the child needs to have a balanced approach of risk to continue to develop and make choices of their own with consequences (if any).
The adult’s role is to encourage the child to explore, learn to make choices and have their voice heard when decisions are being made that involve or affect them.
Health and safety regulations may sometimes put a limit on those freedoms, so for the child's wellbeing and safety we may limit their options. Always give the child an explanation of their actions if you are not allowing them to do the activity that they would like too. If a child is in significant harm during this activity, be as genuine, honest and realistic as possible, explaining it clear and precise at a level and age/stage appropriate why they can’t do this activity. If the child is not in significant harm but they might still hurt themselves explain the consequences of them taking part in this activity.

If you think of anything else or find a a useful website can you let me know, because i'm sure it's not enough but as i said mind just went blank on this question and still is.
Lynne x


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Old 06-05-2013, 10:47 PM
dolphin dolphin is offline
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hi i am stuck on this question
give some age appropriate examples of decisions children and young people can make
and include an explanation of the dilemma this causes in some circumstances between the childs rights and your responsibilities for their safety
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Old 06-06-2013, 02:36 PM
chaz999 chaz999 is offline
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have had this signed off

The challenge for practitioners is balancing the need for safety against the need for children to explore risks, as adults we take risks and engage in risky activities such as bungee jumping. All have risk of death and this gives us a rush or thrill. Similarly children need to explore their own levels of risk-taking but in safe environments. If we try to over protect children and prevent them from taking risks they will seek their own risk-taking when adults are not around.
The EYFS states that we need to conduct a risk assessment and review it regularly, the guidance on play includes the advice 'through play, in a secure but challenging environment with effective adult support, children can take risks and make mistakes'

Example-
A disabled child may be restricted in play at home because of parental concern that the child could hurt themselves, however in a well-controlled environment a child could be encouraged to explore and try out new skills.

The child has the rights and freedom of choice to take risks in exploring new challenges in a safe and controlled environment although this could cause conflict between staff and the parents, should the child be restricted and stay indoors or be allowed to play with the other children outdoors at the risk of an accident?

The practitioner should first talk to the parents and maintain good communication at all times, a risk assessment for the disabled child should be carried out and having a carer observe the child should ease the parents worries.
Allowing the child to play freely without restrictions will help the child’s development, confidence and self-esteem, although at the risk of an accident happening.
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